The long-term treatment outcomes of depression and anxiety comorbid with substance abuse

  • Gregory Bovasso
  • Published 2001 in
    The Journal of Behavioral Health Services…

Abstract

The impact of the comorbidity of psychiatric disorder and substance abuse on treatment outcomes was estimated using data from a longitudinal survey of 1,920 individuals who were followed nearly 15 years. Individuals with anxiety or depression symptoms at baseline generally experienced increased distress at follow-up; those who received mental health treatment experienced decreased distress at follow-up. Individuals with substance abuse/dependence symptoms who received treatment at baseline had a higher risk of follow-up disability; treated individuals with substance abuse who had comorbid anxiety and depression symptoms at baseline were at lower risk of disability at follow-up. Individuals with anxiety and depression symptoms at baseline had a higher incidence of chronic illness during follow-up; those who received treatment or had substance abuse symptoms did not. The results may improve understanding of the degree to which treatment of a primary disorder may prevent the incidence or reduce the prevalence of a secondary comorbid disorder.

DOI: 10.1007/BF02287233

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@article{Bovasso2001TheLT, title={The long-term treatment outcomes of depression and anxiety comorbid with substance abuse}, author={Gregory Bovasso}, journal={The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research}, year={2001}, volume={28}, pages={42-57} }