The long‐term reproductive health consequences of female genital cutting in rural Gambia: a community‐based survey

@article{Morison2001TheLR,
  title={The long‐term reproductive health consequences of female genital cutting in rural Gambia: a community‐based survey},
  author={Linda A. Morison and Caroline Scherf and Gloria Ekpo and Katie Paine and Beryl West and Rosalind L Coleman and Gijs E L Walraven},
  journal={Tropical Medicine \& International Health},
  year={2001},
  volume={6}
}
This paper examines the association between traditional practices of female genital cutting (FGC) and adult women’s reproductive morbidity in rural Gambia. In 1999, we conducted a cross‐sectional community survey of 1348 women aged 15–54 years, to estimate the prevalence of reproductive morbidity on the basis of women’s reports, a gynaecological examination and laboratory analysis of specimens. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to compare the prevalence of each morbidity… 

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