The logic of mate desertion

@article{Lazarus1990TheLO,
  title={The logic of mate desertion},
  author={John Lazarus},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1990},
  volume={39},
  pages={672-684}
}
  • J. Lazarus
  • Published 1 April 1990
  • Economics
  • Animal Behaviour

DESERTING OFFSPRING Parental Investment as a Game of Chicken

We model mates’ interdependent parental investment decisions as a game of Chicken. An individual is better off (in terms of reproductive success) deserting one’s offspring to start a new union if

A dynamic game-theoretic model of parental care.

TLDR
A model in which members of a mated pair decide whether to care for their offspring or desert them is presented and the evolutionarily stable pattern of care over the breeding season is found.

Parental Investment as a Game of Chicken

We model mates' interdependent parental investment decisions as a game of Chicken. An individual is better off (in terms of reproductive success) deserting one's offspring to start a new union if

A mathematical model on the optimal timing of offspring desertion.

Offspring desertion in the Magnificent Frigatebird: are males facing a trade-off between current and future reproduction?

TLDR
Inter-individual variation is consistent with the idea that male frigatebirds may face a trade-off between current and future reproductive expectations: early-settled individuals began breeding before 16 October, deserted before the average deserting date, stayed with the chick for 92 days, their chicks survived well, and 75% of these males were seen in reproductive state the following breeding season.

Sexual conflict over parental care in penduline tits

TLDR
It is argued that it may be in the parents’ best interest to conceal their intention to care for (or desert) their brood, and a game-theoretical model is developed that suggests that a key to resolving the conflict between parents is the sex difference in reproductive payoffs for given parental care strategies.

Sexual conflict over parental care in Penduline Tits Remiz pendulinus: the process of clutch desertion

TLDR
It is suggested that biparental desertion may be simultaneous by male and female in the population of Penduline Tits, because the parents’ interest may be actually to disguise their intention to desert.

Egg burial in penduline tits, Remiz pendulinus: its role in mate desertion and female polyandry

TLDR
Penduline tits perform uniparental care from the earliest point of breeding, and both sexes try to become polygamous, and it is found that a female can only desert the nest before the male deserts when she covers the eggs, and the higher the proportion of eggs afemale can hide, the greater her chance of becoming potyandrous.

Individual variation and the resolution of conflict over parental care in penduline tits

TLDR
It is demonstrated that taking account of individual variation in payoffs explains the patterns of care better than a model based on the average population payoff matrix, and highlights the need for a new generation of individual-based evolutionary game-theoretic models.

Female Burying Beetles Benefit from Male Desertion: Sexual Conflict and Counter-Adaptation over Parental Investment

TLDR
It is suggested that females may have co-evolved to anticipate desertion by their partners so that they now benefit from the male's absence, which reduces components of female fitness to a greater extent than caring for young singlehandedly.
...

References

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A model of mate desertion

Mate desertion in the snail kite

Parental investment: A prospective analysis

Demography, Environmental Uncertainty, and the Evolution of Mate Desertion in the Snail Kite

TLDR
This work examined the demographic and environmental constraints selecting for a clutch size that permits one parent to desert, yet optimizes the number of offspring produced by each parent.

Intraspecific Variations in Mating Strategy

Variability in behavior is examined in broad taxonomic scope with particular reference to mating strategies. The variety of strategy sets exhibited by a wide range of species is reviewed briefly and

The evolution of male and female parental care in fishes

TLDR
The predominance of male parental care in fishes is not explained by males deriving greater benefits from care, but by males paying smaller future costs, and males thus accrue a greater net fitness advantage from parental care.

The Conflict Between Male Polygamy and Female Monogamy: The Case of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca

TLDR
It is contention that, in the "battle between the sexes," the male sex is relatively victorious in the pied flycatcher as compared with most altricial bird species which are strictly or almost strictly monogamous.