The lived experience of Malawian women with obstetric fistula

@article{Yeakey2009TheLE,
  title={The lived experience of Malawian women with obstetric fistula},
  author={Marissa Pine Yeakey and Effie Chipeta and Frank Taulo and Amy O Tsui},
  journal={Culture, Health \& Sexuality},
  year={2009},
  volume={11},
  pages={499 - 513}
}
Data on women who experience obstetric fistula paints an often tragic picture. The majority of previous research has focused on facility-based data from women receiving surgical treatment. The goal of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of the lived experience of obstetric fistula in Malawi. Forty-five women living with fistula were interviewed in their homes to learn how the condition affected them and their families on a daily basis. Findings indicate that the experiences of… Expand
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