The likely worldwide increase in erectile dysfunction between 1995 and 2025 and some possible policy consequences

@article{Ayta1999TheLW,
  title={The likely worldwide increase in erectile dysfunction between 1995 and 2025 and some possible policy consequences},
  author={Aytaç and Mckinlay and Krane},
  journal={BJU International},
  year={1999},
  volume={84}
}
To project the likely worldwide increase in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) over the next 25 years, and to identify and discuss some possible health‐policy consequences using the recent developments in the UK as a case study. 
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