The lexical restructuring hypothesis and graph theoretic analyses of networks based on random lexicons.

@article{Gruenenfelder2009TheLR,
  title={The lexical restructuring hypothesis and graph theoretic analyses of networks based on random lexicons.},
  author={T. Gruenenfelder and D. Pisoni},
  journal={Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR},
  year={2009},
  volume={52 3},
  pages={
          596-609
        }
}
PURPOSE The mental lexicon of words used for spoken word recognition has been modeled as a complex network or graph. Do the characteristics of that graph reflect processes involved in its growth (M. S. Vitevitch, 2008) or simply the phonetic overlap between similar-sounding words? METHOD Three pseudolexicons were generated by randomly selecting phonological segments from a fixed set. Each lexicon was then modeled as a graph, linking words differing by one segment. The properties of those… Expand
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