The length of time required for a selectively neutral mutant to reach fixation through random frequency drift in a finite population.

@article{Kimura1970TheLO,
  title={The length of time required for a selectively neutral mutant to reach fixation through random frequency drift in a finite population.},
  author={M Kimura},
  journal={Genetical research},
  year={1970},
  volume={15 1},
  pages={
          131-3
        }
}
  • M. Kimura
  • Published 1 February 1970
  • Biology
  • Genetical research
A general theory concerning the average number of generations until a mutant gene becomes fixed (established) in a finite population was developed by Kimura & Ohta (1969a) based on the diffusion models. For the special case of selectively neutral mutants, the problem was simplified and it was shown by them that the average length of time until fixation (excluding the cases of eventual loss) is approximately 4:Ne generations, where Ne is the 'variance' effective number of the population (cf… 

Figures from this paper

Population Growth Enhances the Mean Fixation Time of Neutral Mutations and the Persistence of Neutral Variation
TLDR
It is shown that for populations that increase in size, the mean time of fixation can be enhanced, sometimes substantially so, over 4Ne,0 generations, where Ne,0 is the effective population size at the time the mutation arises.
Speed of Gene Substitution in a Geographically Structured Population
TLDR
The rate of decrease in genetic variability and the number of generations required for fixation of a selectively neutral mutant gene were investigated for a geographically structured population using a linear and two-dimensional stepping-stone model of finite size.
Genealogy of neutral genes and spreading of selected mutations in a geographically structured population.
TLDR
Several approximate formulas were developed concerning the coalescence process of neutral genes and the fixation process of selected mutations in an island model and their accuracy was examined by computer simulation, potentially useful for testing quantitatively various hypotheses that have been proposed for the origin of modern human populations.
Fitness dependence of the fixation-time distribution for evolutionary dynamics on graphs
TLDR
This work calculates the fitness dependence of the fixation-time distribution for the Moran Birth-death process in populations modeled by two extreme networks: the complete graph and the one-dimensional ring lattice, each of which admits an exact solution in the limit of large network size.
Probability of fixation of an advantageous mutant in a viral quasispecies.
  • C. Wilke
  • Environmental Science
    Genetics
  • 2003
TLDR
The probability that an advantageous mutant rises to fixation in a viral quasispecies is investigated in the framework of multitype branching processes and two approximations for the probability of fixation are introduced.
Fitness dependence of the fixation-time distribution for evolutionary dynamics on graphs.
TLDR
The fitness dependence of the fixation-time distribution for the Moran Birth-death process in populations modeled by two extreme networks: the complete graph and the one-dimensional ring lattice is calculated, finding that with non-neutral fitness, the Moran process on the ring has normally distributed fixation times, independent of the relative fitness of mutants and nonmutants.
SPECIES NUMBER, GENERATION LENGTH, AND THE MOLECULAR CLOCK
  • K. Korey
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1981
TLDR
It is demonstrated that species number and generation length may be important determinants of the degree to which proteins diverge over time, and that variability in these parameters might easily lead both to the impression that molecular evolution rates are nonconstant and to the systematic underestimation of species divergence times.
Time for spreading of compensatory mutations under gene duplication.
TLDR
It was shown that, when 2Nv- is much less than unity, the time for spreading is greatly shortened by gene duplication as compared with the case of complete linkage between the two sites of mutations, where 2N is the effective population size (haploid) and v- is the rate of compensatory mutations.
Revisiting the notion of deleterious sweeps
TLDR
It is found that, while deleterious sweeps are unlikely to represent a significant proportion of outliers in polymorphism-based genomic scans within populations, minor shifts in the frequencies of deleteriously mutations can influence the proportions of private variants and the value of FST after a recent population split.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
A note on the diffusion approximation for the variance of the number of generations until fixation of a neutral mutant gene.
A general expression is derived for the variance of time to fixation of a neutral gene in a finite population using a diffusion approximation. The results are compared with exact values derived by
THE MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE POPULATION NUMBER
TLDR
The effective number of an actual population is defined as the size of an idealized population with the same amount of inbreeding or random gene frequency drift as the population under consideration.
SOLUTION OF A PROCESS OF RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT WITH A CONTINUOUS MODEL.
  • M. Kimura
  • Physics, Geology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1955
30 See H. C. Urey, Geochim. et cosmochim. acta, 1, 209-277, 1951; see, particularly, pp. 233 ff. This paper was reproduced in The Planets, pp. 124 and 141, particularly. Later G. P. Kuiper published
The measurement of effective population
  • number. Evolution
  • 1963