The lek paradox and the capture of genetic variance by condition dependent traits

@article{Rowe1996TheLP,
  title={The lek paradox and the capture of genetic variance by condition dependent traits},
  author={L. Rowe and D. Houle},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={1415 - 1421}
}
  • L. Rowe, D. Houle
  • Published 1996
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
Recent evidence suggests that sexually selected traits have unexpectedly high genetic variance. In this paper, we offer a simple and general mechanism to explain this observation. Our explanation offers a resolution to the lek paradox and rests on only two assumptions; condition dependence of sexually selected traits and high genetic variance in condition. The former assumption is well supported by empirical evidence. We discuss the evidence for the latter assumption. These two assumptions lead… Expand

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