The leap second: its history and possible future

@article{Nelson2001TheLS,
  title={The leap second: its history and possible future},
  author={R A Nelson and D D McCarthy and S Malys and J Levine and B Guinot and H F Fliegel and R L Beard and T R Bartholomew},
  journal={Metrologia},
  year={2001},
  volume={38},
  pages={509 - 529}
}
This paper reviews the theoretical motivation for the leap second in the context of the historical evolution of time measurement. The periodic insertion of a leap second step into the scale of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) necessitates frequent changes in complex timekeeping systems and is currently the subject of discussion in working groups of various international scientific organizations. UTC is an atomic time scale that agrees in rate with International Atomic Time (TAI), but differs by… 
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The Leap Second - Its History and Possible Future

This paper reviews the theoretical motivation for the leap second in the context of the historical evolution of time measurement. The periodic insertion of a leap second step into the scale of

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