The language of magnitude comparison.

@article{Matthews2014TheLO,
  title={The language of magnitude comparison.},
  author={William J. Matthews and Alexandra S Dylman},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={2014},
  volume={143 2},
  pages={
          510-20
        }
}
When 2 objects differ in magnitude, their relation can be described with a "smaller" comparative (e.g., less, shorter, lower) or a "larger" comparative (e.g., more, taller, higher). We show that, across multiple dimensions and tasks, English speakers preferentially use the latter. In sentence completion tasks, this higher use of larger comparatives (HULC) effect is more pronounced when the larger item is presented on the left (for simultaneous presentation) or second (for sequential… CONTINUE READING
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