The knowledge pyramid: a critique of the DIKW hierarchy

@article{Frick2009TheKP,
  title={The knowledge pyramid: a critique of the DIKW hierarchy},
  author={Martin Frick{\'e}},
  journal={Journal of Information Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={35},
  pages={131 - 142}
}
  • Martin Frické
  • Published 1 April 2009
  • Philosophy
  • Journal of Information Science
The paper evaluates the data—information—knowledge—wisdom (DIKW) hierarchy. This hierarchy, also known as the `knowledge hierarchy', is part of the canon of information science and management. Arguments are offered that the hierarchy is unsound and methodologically undesirable. The paper identifies a central logical error that DIKW makes. The paper also identifies the dated and unsatisfactory philosophical positions of operationalism and inductivism as the philosophical backdrop to the… 

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