The junctional pore complex, a prokaryotic secretion organelle, is the molecular motor underlying gliding motility in cyanobacteria

@article{Hoiczyk1998TheJP,
  title={The junctional pore complex, a prokaryotic secretion organelle, is the molecular motor underlying gliding motility in cyanobacteria},
  author={Egbert Hoiczyk and Wolfgang Baumeister},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={1998},
  volume={8},
  pages={1161-1168}
}
BACKGROUND Whereas most bacteria move by means of flagella, some prokaryotes move by gliding. In cyanobacteria, gliding motility is a slow uniform motion which is invariably accompanied by a continuous secretion of slime. On the basis of these characteristics, a model has been proposed in which the gliding motility of cyanobacteria depends on the steady secretion of slime using specific pores, as well as the interaction of the slime with the filament surface and the underlying substrate… Expand
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  • E. Hoiczyk
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  • Archives of Microbiology
  • 2000
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