The involucrin gene of Old-World monkeys and other higher primates: synapomorphies and parallelisms resulting from the same gene-altering mechanism.

@article{Djian1992TheIG,
  title={The involucrin gene of Old-World monkeys and other higher primates: synapomorphies and parallelisms resulting from the same gene-altering mechanism.},
  author={Philippe Djian and Howard Green},
  journal={Molecular biology and evolution},
  year={1992},
  volume={9 3},
  pages={
          417-32
        }
}
The involucrin gene of platyrrhines and hominoids contains a segment of 10-codon repeats which were added vectorially at the same site in the coding region. We have now cloned and sequenced the involucrin gene of four cercopithecoid monkeys--two macaques (mulatta and fascicularis) and two Cercopithecus monkeys (aethiops and hamlyni). Each gene contains a similar segment of short repeats; some of these were added in a common anthropoid lineage, others were added in a common catarrhine lineage… 

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References

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TLDR
The mechanism that was established in the common anthropoid lineage for the addition of repeats at a definite site in the coding region was transmitted to both platyrrhines and catarrhines, enabling each to generate its middle region independently.
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TLDR
The coding region of the involucrin gene of the gibbon (Hylobates lar), including the segment of repeats, has been cloned and sequenced, and its repeat structure can now be compared with that of the other hominoids.
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TLDR
The nucleotide sequence of three alleles of the gorilla involucrin gene, which possesses a modern segment homologous to that of the human and consisting of 10-codon repeats, is reported here.
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TLDR
The involucrin genes of the prosimian primates and of the anthropoid primates possess nonhomologous segments of repeats located at two different sites, P and M, within the coding region, and the two lineages followed alternative routes in the revision of their involucin genes.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Quantitative comparisons by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that certain primate involucrins have a higher density of antigenic determinants than the human protein, whereas others lack some determinant(s).
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