The invisible frontier. A multiple species model for the origin of behavioral modernity

@article{dErrico2003TheIF,
  title={The invisible frontier. A multiple species model for the origin of behavioral modernity},
  author={Francesco d’Errico},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
  • F. d’Errico
  • Published 2003
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues
Two contradictory theories of human cognitive evolution have been developed to model how, when, and among what hominid groups behavioral modernity emerged. The first model, which has long been the dominant paradigm, links these behavioral innovations to a cultural “revolution” by anatomically modern humans in Europe at around 40,000 years ago, coinciding with the first arrival of our species in this region.1–4 According to this model, the sudden and explosive character of this change is… 
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