The invasive species Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) increases soil nutrient availability in northern hardwood-conifer forests

@article{Rodgers2008TheIS,
  title={The invasive species Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) increases soil nutrient availability in northern hardwood-conifer forests},
  author={Vikki L. Rodgers and Benjamin E. Wolfe and Leland K. Werden and Adrien C. Finzi},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2008},
  volume={157},
  pages={459-471}
}
The invasion of non-native plants can alter the diversity and activity of soil microorganisms and nutrient cycling within forests. We used field studies to analyze the impact of a successful invasive groundcover, Alliaria petiolata, on fungal diversity, soil nutrient availability, and pH in five northeastern US forests. We also used laboratory and greenhouse experiments to test three mechanisms by which A. petiolata may alter soil processes: (1) the release of volatile, cyanogenic glucosides… Expand
Invasive plant (Alliaria petiolata; garlic mustard) homogenizes fungal community composition and increases fungal richness
TLDR
In summary, invasion was associated with fundamentally different soil fungal communities and this was correlated with altered edaphic soil properties and the abundance of garlic mustard across the invaded landscape. Expand
Deer and invasive plant removal alters mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil chemistry: Evidence from a long-term field experiment
Abstract The invasive plant, garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), has the potential to affect soil microbial communities and ecosystem processes in temperate hardwood forests primarily through theExpand
Impacts of the invasive annual herb Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. on soil microbial carbon source utilization and enzymatic activities
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The improvement of soil fertility as well as microbial community function in invaded soils may be beneficial to A. artemisiifolia and contribute to its establishment in new habitats. Expand
Invasive Plant Ecology In Vermont: Insights From Spatial Analysis And Interactions Of Garlic Mustard (alliaria Petiolata) With Native Plants And Invertebrates
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The traits and distribution of invasive plants in Vermont are examined using spatial analysis, laboratory and field studies, and GIS is used to investigate environmental factors correlated with presence of 19 invasive plant species in Vermont campgrounds to support the assumption that human dispersal of invasive plant seed and stock may be more important than natural dispersal. Expand
Habitat Preference Within Its Native Range and Allelopathy of Garlic Mustard Alliaria petiolata
  • N. Šajna
  • Biology
  • Polish Journal of Ecology
  • 2017
TLDR
The results showed that A. petiolata populations can become established at disturbed sites, even such without a tree canopy, but dense stands can be found only at disturbed forest edges, allowing predicting that the success of A. Petiolata invasion in a non-native range might rely on its variable habitat tolerance and allelopathy. Expand
Competitive interactions between a nonmycorrhizal invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, and a suite of mycorrhizal grassland, old field, and forest species
TLDR
Findings indicate that the inhibitory potential of A. petiolata on competitor species via mycorrhizal suppression is not enhanced under nutrient limitation, and competition between A. Petiolata and other species was stronger in control than history soil. Expand
Impacts of the alien trees Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and Robinia pseudoacacia L. on soil nutrients and microbial communities
Abstract Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and Robinia pseudoacacia L. are two aggressive invasive trees in riparian areas in Central Spain. We aim to test whether soil properties, nutrientExpand
Plant invasion alters the physico-chemical dynamics of soil system: insights from invasive Leucanthemum vulgare in the Indian Himalaya
TLDR
The results of the present study indicate that L. vulgare, by altering key properties of the soil system, is likely to influence nutrient cycling processes and facilitates positive feedback for itself, which has wide management implications in the effective ecological restoration of the invaded landscapes. Expand
Functional shifts of soil microbial communities associated with Alliaria petiolata invasion
TLDR
No changes in the diversity and abundance of AMF in plants co-occurring with A. petiolata are found, suggesting that mycorrhizal suppression in the field may not be as critical to the invasion of A. Petiolata as implied by more controlled experiments, and changes in pathogen community composition are found. Expand
The invasive plant Impatiens glandulifera affects mycorrhizal fungi, plant and invertebrate diversity in deciduous forests
Invasive species can have far-reaching impacts on ecosystems. Invasive plants may be able to change habitat structure and quality. We conducted a field experiment to examine whether the invasiveExpand
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