The interplay between the intestinal microbiota and the brain

@article{Collins2012TheIB,
  title={The interplay between the intestinal microbiota and the brain},
  author={S. Collins and M. Surette and P. Bercik},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={10},
  pages={735-742}
}
The intestinal microbiota consists of a vast bacterial community that resides primarily in the lower gut and lives in a symbiotic relationship with the host. A bidirectional neurohumoral communication system, known as the gut–brain axis, integrates the host gut and brain activities. Here, we describe the recent advances in our understanding of how the intestinal microbiota communicates with the brain via this axis to influence brain development and behaviour. We also review how this extended… Expand
915 Citations

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