The interaction of temperature and sucrose concentration on foraging preferences in bumblebees

@article{Whitney2008TheIO,
  title={The interaction of temperature and sucrose concentration on foraging preferences in bumblebees},
  author={Heather M. Whitney and Adrian G. Dyer and Lars Chittka and Sean A. Rands and Beverley J. Glover},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2008},
  volume={95},
  pages={845-850}
}
Several authors have found that flowers that are warmer than their surrounding environment have an advantage in attracting pollinators. Bumblebees will forage preferentially on warmer flowers, even if equal nutritional reward is available in cooler flowers. This raises the question of whether warmth and sucrose concentration are processed independently by bees, or whether sweetness detectors respond to higher sugar concentration as well as higher temperature. We find that bumblebees can use… Expand
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