The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development

@article{Vickaryous2009TheIS,
  title={The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development},
  author={M. Vickaryous and J. Sire},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2009},
  volume={214}
}
Although often overlooked, the integument of many tetrapods is reinforced by a morphologically and structurally diverse assemblage of skeletal elements. [...] Key Result Three types of tetrapod integumentary elements are recognized: (1) osteoderms, common to representatives of most major taxonomic lineages; (2) dermal scales, unique to gymnophionans; and (3) the lamina calcarea, an enigmatic tissue found only in some anurans.Expand
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