The institutional foundations of hegemony: explaining the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act of 1934

@article{Haggard1988TheIF,
  title={The institutional foundations of hegemony: explaining the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act of 1934},
  author={Stephan Haggard},
  journal={International Organization},
  year={1988},
  volume={42},
  pages={91-119}
}
  • Stephan Haggard
  • Published 1 December 1988
  • Economics
  • International Organization
In 1930, Congress approved the highly restrictive Smoot–Hawley tariff, the textbook case of pressure group politics run amok. Four years later, Congress passed the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act (RTAA), surrendering much of its tariff-making authority to a policy process in which internationalists had increasing influence. While the United States had used reciprocity to expand exports before, the stick of discriminatory treatment took precedence over the carrot of liberalizing concessions… 
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