The innocent prisoner and the appellate prosecutor: Some thoughts on post‐conviction prosecutorial ethics after Dretke v. Haley

@article{Cunningham2005TheIP,
  title={The innocent prisoner and the appellate prosecutor: Some thoughts on post‐conviction prosecutorial ethics after Dretke v. Haley},
  author={L. Cunningham},
  journal={Criminal Justice Ethics},
  year={2005},
  volume={24},
  pages={12 - 24}
}
  • L. Cunningham
  • Published 2005
  • Sociology
  • Criminal Justice Ethics
  • We typically think of prosecutorial ethics as encompassing a special set of obligations for prosecutors during the pretrial and trial stages of a criminal case. In the literature and in rules of professional responsibility much attention is paid to the charging function, contact with unrepresented persons, plea negotiations, discovery, and courtroom decorum. Our concern with prosecutorial ethics at these stages is rooted primarily in due process and fairness to the accused. [W]hile he may… CONTINUE READING

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