The influence of organizational structure on software quality

@article{Nagappan2008TheIO,
  title={The influence of organizational structure on software quality},
  author={Nachiappan Nagappan and Brendan Murphy and Victor R. Basili},
  journal={2008 ACM/IEEE 30th International Conference on Software Engineering},
  year={2008},
  pages={521-530}
}
Often software systems are developed by organizations consisting of many teams of individuals working together. Brooks states in the Mythical Man Month book that product quality is strongly affected by organization structure. Unfortunately there has been little empirical evidence to date to substantiate this assertion. In this paper we present a metric scheme to quantify organizational complexity, in relation to the product development process to identify if the metrics impact failure-proneness… 
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