The influence of hypoxia on the thermal sensitivity of skin colouration in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps

@article{Velasco2008TheIO,
  title={The influence of hypoxia on the thermal sensitivity of skin colouration in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps},
  author={Jesus Barraza de Velasco and Glenn J. Tattersall},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2008},
  volume={178},
  pages={867-875}
}
One physiological mechanism used by reptiles to remain within thermal optima is their ability to reversibly alter skin colour, imparting changes in overall reflectance, and influencing the rate of heat gain from incident radiation. The ability to lighten or darken their skin is caused by the movement of pigment within the dermal chromatophore cells. Additionally, lizards, as ectotherms, significantly lower their preferred body temperatures when experiencing stressors such as hypoxia. This… Expand
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