The influence of footwear on the prevalence of flat foot. A survey of 2300 children.

@article{Rao1992TheIO,
  title={The influence of footwear on the prevalence of flat foot. A survey of 2300 children.},
  author={Udaya Bhaskara Rao and B Joseph},
  journal={The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume},
  year={1992},
  volume={74 4},
  pages={
          525-7
        }
}
  • U. B. Rao, B. Joseph
  • Published 1992
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume
We analysed static footprints of 2300 children between the ages of four and 13 years to establish the influence of footwear on the prevalence of flat foot. The incidence among children who used footwear was 8.6% compared with 2.8% in those who did not (p less than 0.001). Significant differences between the predominance in shod and unshod children were noted in all age groups, most marked in those with generalised ligament laxity. Flat foot was most common in children who wore closed-toe shoes… Expand

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