The influence of color on snake detection in visual search in human children

@article{Hayakawa2011TheIO,
  title={The influence of color on snake detection in visual search in human children},
  author={Sachiko Hayakawa and Nobuyuki Kawai and Nobuo Masataka},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2011},
  volume={1}
}
It is well known that adult humans detect snakes as targets more quickly than flowers as the targets and that how rapidly they detect a snake picture does not differ whether the images are in color or gray-scale, whereas they find a flower picture more rapidly when the images are in color than when the images are gray-scale. In the present study, a total of 111 children were presented with 3-by-3 matrices of images of snakes and flowers in either color or gray-scale displays. Unlike the adults… 

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