The influence of age and gender on affect, physiology, and their interrelations: a study of long-term marriages.

@article{Levenson1994TheIO,
  title={The influence of age and gender on affect, physiology, and their interrelations: a study of long-term marriages.},
  author={Robert W Levenson and Laura L. Carstensen and John M. Gottman},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={1994},
  volume={67 1},
  pages={
          56-68
        }
}
Self-reported affect and autonomic and somatic physiology were studied during three 15-min conversations (events of the day, problem area, pleasant topic) in a sample of 151 couples in long-term marriages. Couples differed in age (40-50 or 60-70) and marital satisfaction (satisfied or dissatisfied). Marital interaction in older couples was associated with more affective positivity and lower physiological arousal (even when controlling for affective differences) than in middle-age couples. As… 
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