The influence of FMRI lie detection evidence on juror decision-making.

@article{Mccabe2011TheIO,
  title={The influence of FMRI lie detection evidence on juror decision-making.},
  author={D. P. Mccabe and A. Castel and M. Rhodes},
  journal={Behavioral sciences \& the law},
  year={2011},
  volume={29 4},
  pages={
          566-77
        }
}
In the current study, we report on an experiment examining whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) lie detection evidence would influence potential jurors' assessment of guilt in a criminal trial. Potential jurors (N = 330) read a vignette summarizing a trial, with some versions of the vignette including lie detection evidence indicating that the defendant was lying about having committed the crime. Lie detector evidence was based on evidence from the polygraph, fMRI (functional… Expand

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