The infection rates of trypanosomes in squirrel monkeys at two sites in the Brazilian Amazon.

@article{Ziccardi1997TheIR,
  title={The infection rates of trypanosomes in squirrel monkeys at two sites in the Brazilian Amazon.},
  author={Mariangela Ziccardi and Ricardo Lourenço-de-Oliveira},
  journal={Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz},
  year={1997},
  volume={92 4},
  pages={
          465-70
        }
}
A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of natural infections by trypanosome species in squirrel monkeys: Saimiri sciureus (Linnaeus) and Saimiri ustus (Geoffroy) caught respectively near 2 hydroelectric plants: Balbina, in the State of Amazonas, and Samuel, in the State of Rondônia, Brazil. A total of 165 squirrel monkeys were examined by thick and thin blood smears (BS), haemocultures and xenodiagnosis: 112 monkeys, 67.9% (being 52.7% with mix infections) were positive to… Expand
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