The imprint of action: Motor cortex involvement in visual perception of handwritten letters

@article{Longcamp2006TheIO,
  title={The imprint of action: Motor cortex involvement in visual perception of handwritten letters},
  author={Marieke Longcamp and T. Tanskanen and R. Hari},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2006},
  volume={33},
  pages={681-688}
}
Humans are able to recognize handwritten texts accurately despite the extreme variability of scripts from one writer to another. This skill has been suggested to rely on the observer's own knowledge about implicit motor rules involved in writing. To investigate the possible neural correlates of such an ability, we monitored with magnetoencephalography (MEG) the approximately 20-Hz oscillations originating from the motor cortex. The oscillations were more suppressed after visual presentation of… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 CITATIONS, ESTIMATED 90% COVERAGE

Writing's Shadow: Corticospinal Activation during Letter Observation

  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
  • 2012
VIEW 9 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND, RESULTS & METHODS
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

How Learning Experience Shapes the Cognitive and Neural Representations of Letters

VIEW 5 EXCERPTS
CITES METHODS, BACKGROUND & RESULTS
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

2007
2018

CITATION STATISTICS

  • 3 Highly Influenced Citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES

Activation of human primary motor cortex during action observation: a neuromagnetic study.

  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1998
VIEW 7 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

The assessment and analysis of handedness

R. C. Oldfield
  • Neuropsychologia
  • 1971
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

The mirror-neuron system.

  • Annual review of neuroscience
  • 2004
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Authorship effects in the prediction of handwriting strokes: evidence for action simulation during action perception.

  • The Quarterly journal of experimental psychology. A, Human experimental psychology
  • 2002
VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL