The importance of species identity in the biocontrol process: identifying the subspecies of Acacia nilotica (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) by genetic distance and the implications for biological control

@article{Wardill2005TheIO,
  title={The importance of species identity in the biocontrol process: identifying the subspecies of Acacia nilotica (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) by genetic distance and the implications for biological control},
  author={T. Wardill and G. C. Graham and M. Zalucki and W. Palmer and J. Playford and K. Scott},
  journal={Journal of Biogeography},
  year={2005},
  volume={32},
  pages={2145-2159}
}
Aims A molecular genetic distance study has been used in an initial survey to identify subspecies and genotypes of the weed Acacia nilotica in Australia, information needed to find suitable biocontrol agents. We use patterns of DNA sequence variation (in two DNA fragments) from each of the nine described subspecies of Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) that is to determine their genetic similarity, to verify if the Australian populations are A. nilotica ssp. indica (Benth… Expand
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