The importance of social structure and social interaction in stereotype consensus and content: is the whole greater than the sum of its parts?

@article{Stott2004TheIO,
  title={The importance of social structure and social interaction in stereotype consensus and content: is the whole greater than the sum of its parts?},
  author={Clifford Stott and John Drury},
  journal={European Journal of Social Psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={34},
  pages={11-23}
}
This paper addresses the hypothesis derived from self-categorisation theory (SCT) that the relationship between groups and stereotyping will be affected by the social structural conditions within which group interaction occurs. A mixed design experiment (n = 56) measured low-status groups stereotypes and preferences for conflict with a high-status outgroup prior to and after within-group discussion across varying social structural conditions. Over time, participants in open conditions… 

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