The importance of nestling location for obtaining food in open cup-nests

@article{Ostreiher2001TheIO,
  title={The importance of nestling location for obtaining food in open cup-nests},
  author={Roni Ostreiher},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={49},
  pages={340-347}
}
  • Roni Ostreiher
  • Published 23 April 2001
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Abstract. Observations and experiments were carried out at 34 four-nestling nests of Arabian babblers (Turdoides squamiceps) and feeding events were analyzed according to hatching order and nestling location in the nest. Nestlings were fed in a negative correlation with hatching order. Nestling locations in relation to the provisioners were defined as Near, Far, Right, Left, and Center. Feeders fed closer nestlings more often than those further away, and straight ahead rather than sideways. In… Expand

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