The importance of genomic variation for biodiversity, ecosystems and people

@article{Stange2020TheIO,
  title={The importance of genomic variation for biodiversity, ecosystems and people},
  author={Madlen Stange and Rowan D. H. Barrett and Andrew P. Hendry},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2020},
  volume={22},
  pages={89-105}
}
The 2019 United Nations Global assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services estimated that approximately 1 million species are at risk of extinction. This primarily human-driven loss of biodiversity has unprecedented negative consequences for ecosystems and people. Classic and emerging approaches in genetics and genomics have the potential to dramatically improve these outcomes. In particular, the study of interactions among genetic loci within and between species will play a… 

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