The importance of experience in the interpretation of conspecific chemical signals

@article{Saleh2006TheIO,
  title={The importance of experience in the interpretation of conspecific chemical signals},
  author={Nehal Saleh and Lars Chittka},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={61},
  pages={215-220}
}
Foraging bumblebees scent mark flowers with hydrocarbon secretions. Several studies have found these scent marks act as a repellent to bee foragers. This was thought to minimize the risk of visiting recently depleted flowers. Some studies, however, have found a reverse, attractive effect of scent marks left on flowers. Do bees mark flowers with different scents, or could the same scent be interpreted differently depending on the bees’ previous experience with reward levels in flowers? We use a… Expand

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