Corpus ID: 16431307

The importance of birds as browsers, pollinators and seed dispersers in New Zealand forests

@article{Clout1989TheIO,
  title={The importance of birds as browsers, pollinators and seed dispersers in New Zealand forests},
  author={M. Clout and J. R. Hay},
  journal={New Zealand Journal of Ecology},
  year={1989},
  volume={12},
  pages={27-33}
}
New Zealand's forest plants evolved in the absence of mammalian herbivores, but subject to the attentions of a variety of other animals. Insects are and probably were, the primary folivores, but birds may also have been important. Several extinct birds, notably moas (Dinornithidae), were herbivores, and speculation continues about their impact on the vegetation 
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