The implications of global climatic changes for international security

@article{Gleick1989TheIO,
  title={The implications of global climatic changes for international security},
  author={Peter H. Gleick},
  journal={Climatic Change},
  year={1989},
  volume={15},
  pages={309-325}
}
  • P. Gleick
  • Published 1 October 1989
  • Economics
  • Climatic Change
Global climatic changes caused by growing concentrations of atmospheric trace gases have the potential to alter international relationships, economics, behavior, and security. While there is debate about the extent to which environmental problems alone can lead to conflict, it is widely acknowledged that resource constraints can act as roots leading to economic pressures and tensions, or as triggers to conflict when other pressures and tensions exist between states. Recent widespread attention… Expand

Figures from this paper

Climate Change and International Politics: Problems Facing Developing Countries
Global climate changes caused by human activities have the potential to alter agricultural productivity, freshwater availability and quality, sea level, and many other factors of importance toExpand
Climate and conflicts: the security risks of global warming
Since the publication of the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, the securitization of global warming has reached a new level. Numerous publicExpand
Global Climatic Changes and Geopolitics: Pressures on Developed and Developing Countries
Large-scale climatic changes may lead to international frictions and resource competition between both developed and developing countries for three principal reasons: the major responsibility for theExpand
Environmental Security Concerns: Sources
We are witnessing a new phenomenon in the global arena: the environmental dimension to security issues. It reflects those environmental factors - water, soil, vegetation, climate, and whatever othersExpand
The effects of future climatic changes on international water resources: the Colorado River, the United States, and Mexico
International water resources have been a source of contention in many parts of the world over the last few decades and such conflicts may grow in frequency and severity as future climatic changesExpand
Climate Change, Conflict, and Cooperation: Global Analysis of the Resilience of International River Treaties to Increased Water Variability
Although water variability has already been observed across river basins, climate change is predicted to increase variability. Such environmental changes may aggravate political tensions, especiallyExpand
Climate change, conflict, and cooperation: Global analysis of the effectiveness of international river treaties in addressing water variability
Abstract Climate-driven water variability is a natural phenomenon that is observed across river basins, but one that is predicted to increase due to climate change. Environmental change of this kindExpand
Resource Scarcity: Responding to the Security Challenge
ing from this and other sources, we can suggest several hypotheses about scarcity-security challenges related to climate change: • Climate change will weaken states that are already not able toExpand
Global Environmental Issues and International Politics
Over the last few decades, concern over the international implications of large-scale environmental problems has begun to command the attention of policymakers. The landmark 1972 United NationsExpand
The politics of water scarcity in the Euphrates and Jordan river basins
Conventional works in international relations have generally concentrated on security policy concerns by calibrating the military and economic capabilities of states in order to explain stateExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 18 REFERENCES
The effects of future climatic changes on international water resources: the Colorado River, the United States, and Mexico
International water resources have been a source of contention in many parts of the world over the last few decades and such conflicts may grow in frequency and severity as future climatic changesExpand
Climatic variation and surface water resources in the Great Basin Region
: There is mounting evidence that increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide may lead to significant changes in global climate during the next century. The possible effects of such climaticExpand
Climatic change and world affairs
Climate is a condition of life. When it changes, so must we. Yet until recently, most people would not admit any real possibility of climatic change in their calculations of past, present, andExpand
Reform in Soviet Politics: The Lessons of Recent Policies on Land and Water
This book examines the record of the Brezhnev regime in its only major domestic innovation: the attempt to modernise Soviet agriculture. Under Brezhnev, the Soviets have invested more than half aExpand
International Law and Natural Resource Policies
This article points out the relevance of international law to an understanding of international natural resources issues. It notes that international law shapes the international system forExpand
Soviet Oil and Security Interests in the Barents Sea
The various political, economic, and military problems that could arise if the USSR, Norway, or other western nations begin exploring and producing oil in the Barents Sea are examined. TheExpand
The possible impact on the arctic ocean of the proposed transfer of water from the northern rivers of the USSR to the south
Abstract A critic of excessive interbasin diversion of water from the northern to the southern watershed of Eurasia questions some of the estimates of water requirements in the southern regions ofExpand
A look at 1983 CO2 emissions from fossil fuels (with preliminary data for 1984)
During 1983, global emissions of CO2 from fossil fuels continued to decline slightly, to a value of 4932 millions tons carbon compared to 4957 million tons carbon in 1982. This marked the 4thExpand
Conventional Hydrocarbons in the United States Arctic: An Industry Appraisal
Arctic crude oil production has greatly improved the overall energy security of the United States. For example, crude oil from the onshore Prudhoe Bay field on the Alaskan North Slope already is theExpand
A look at 1983 CO 2 emissions from fossil (with preliminary data for 1984) fuels
During 1983, global emissions of CO 2 from fossil fuels continued to decline slightly. to a value of 4932 millions tons carbon compared to 4957 million tons carbon in 1982. This marked the 4thExpand
...
1
2
...