The impact of environmental noise on song amplitude in a territorial bird

@article{Brumm2004TheIO,
  title={The impact of environmental noise on song amplitude in a territorial bird},
  author={H. Brumm},
  journal={Journal of Animal Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={73},
  pages={434-440}
}
  • H. Brumm
  • Published 2004
  • Geography
  • Journal of Animal Ecology
Summary 1. The impact of environmental background noise on the performance of territorial songs was examined in free-ranging nightingales ( Luscinia megarhynchos Brehm). An analysis of sound pressure levels revealed that males at noisier locations sang with higher sound levels than birds in territories less affected by background sounds. 2. This is the first evidence of a noise-dependent vocal amplitude regulation in the natural environment of an animal. 3. The results yielded demonstrate that… Expand

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