Corpus ID: 17639541

The impact of depression on the academic productivity of university students.

@article{Hysenbegasi2005TheIO,
  title={The impact of depression on the academic productivity of university students.},
  author={Alketa Hysenbegasi and Steven L. Hass and Clayton R. Rowland},
  journal={The journal of mental health policy and economics},
  year={2005},
  volume={8 3},
  pages={
          145-51
        }
}
BACKGROUND Depression is a common disorder that impacts an individual's ability to perform life activities, including those required by the workplace. Academic performance can be viewed as a direct parallel to workforce performance, with students belonging to a unique set of individuals whose ability to perform can be measured on criteria applied by an observer and by self-report. While the prevalence of depression for this group is high and preparation for entry into the workplace is critical… Expand

Paper Mentions

Observational Clinical Trial
The COVID-19 outbreak has been rapidly transmitted in late January 2020 and aroused enormous attention globally. The public at large may also experience boredom, disappointment, and… Expand
ConditionsMental Health Wellness 1
Depressive symptoms and academic performance of North Carolina college students.
TLDR
Students reporting even a small number of depressive symptoms may be at increased risk for academic problems, and this cross-sectional study examines the relation between depression and academic performance in students at a large urban university in North Carolina. Expand
Impact of depression on the academic performance of international students in Udayana University
TLDR
The impact of depression, especially on the academic performance of students who are abroad, studies along with the risk factors of depression to know the relationship between depression and the academic performances of international students studying abroad. Expand
A longitudinal cohort study to explore the relationship between depression, anxiety and academic performance among Emirati university students
TLDR
This study confirms previous findings that around a third of university students are likely to be experiencing a depressive disorder at any one time and provides important evidence regarding the negative impacts of emotional difficulties on students’ academic performance. Expand
The Correlation between Academic Success and Depressive Symptoms among Students in Kosovo
Depression is a state of low mood characterized by depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, decreased energy of the person, feelings of guilt, low self-esteem, and poor concentration. TheseExpand
Depression's Influence on Involvement
TLDR
Interestingly, the relationship between depression and involvement was not significant for any of the three types of involvement, indicating depression had little influence on student involvement. Expand
Association of Depression with Academic Performance Among Final Year MBBS Students of Rawalpindi Medical University, Pakistan
Depression is a typical mental illness among students, particularly medical students, because of their extremely competitive learning environment. Depression negatively affect the cognitive abilitiesExpand
Preliminary development of a bystander intervention scale for depression and the examination of socio-demographic correlates amongst Singapore university students
TLDR
This study identifies sub-groups of the student population that require more education to intervene with depressed peers and also informs the development of future strategies to assess bystander intervention in depression amongst university students. Expand
Depression symptoms in Canadian psychology graduate students: Do research productivity, funding, and the academic advisory relationship play a role?
Depression is one of the most common psychological disorders affecting university students (Rimmer, Halikas, & Schuckit, 1982; Vazquez & Blanco, 2008); however, undergraduate students have receivedExpand
Depression in university students: associations with impulse control disorders
TLDR
Results suggest a significant association between depression and impulse control disorders, and one possibility is that a facet of impulsivity contributes to both problems, which could be important information for clinicians. Expand
A synopsis of the mental health concerns of university students: results of a text-based online survey from one Australian university
Within the university community, student demographic data highlights a high level of cultural diversity and an ‘at-risk’ population for the onset of mental health problems. Moreover, the transitionExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
The economic impact of depression in a workplace.
  • D. J. Conti, W. Burton
  • Medicine, Engineering
  • Journal of occupational medicine. : official publication of the Industrial Medical Association
  • 1994
TLDR
Depressive disorders were found to have the largest medical plan costs of all behavioral health diagnoses and proved to be the most common Axis-I-level diagnosis encountered in the Employee Assistance Program. Expand
Management of Major Depression in the Workplace
TLDR
This analysis implies that the workplace benefits from improved functioning are substantial and may in fact exceed the usual costs of depression treatment, and argues in favour of more aggressive outreach to employees with symptomatic disease that results in initiation of treatment before their symptoms are allowed to persist and result in a disability claim. Expand
Workplace performance effects from chronic depression and its treatment.
TLDR
Evidence is presented supporting the hypotheses that for chronically depressed individuals: (i) the level of perceived at-work performance is negatively related to the severity of depressive status; and (ii) a reduction in depressive severity improves the patient's perceived work performance. Expand
The role of health risk factors and disease on worker productivity.
TLDR
A measure of the actual decrease in the productivity of employees while they are on the job is included, in addition to measures of absenteeism and disability, to produce a Worker Productivity Index. Expand
Depression: a neglected major illness.
TLDR
Depression often is not properly recognized and begins to affect many people at a relatively early age, it exacts costs over a longer period of time and in a more subtle manner than other major illnesses. Expand
Depression in the workplace: effects on short-term disability.
TLDR
Depressed workers were found to have between 1.5 and 3.2 more short-term work-disability days in a thirty-day period than other workers, which suggests that encouraging depressed workers to obtain treatment might be cost-effective for some employers. Expand
Depression, disability days, and days lost from work in a prospective epidemiologic survey.
TLDR
The threshold for identifying clinically significant depression may need to be reevaluated to include persons with fewer symptoms but measurable morbidity, only by changing the nosology can the societal impact of depression be adequately addressed. Expand
The economic burden of depression in 1990.
TLDR
Depression imposes significant annual costs on society, and the true burden of this illness may be even greater than is implied by the estimate. Expand
Absenteeism among employees treated for depression.
TLDR
The data suggest that alternative treatments for depression may have differential impact on indirect costs, but further research is warranted. Expand
The economic burden of depression.
TLDR
These economic figures provide a lower-bound estimate of the full economic burden of major depression and further emphasize the need for timely recognition and treatment to potentially minimize the negative impact of the illness on society. Expand
...
1
2
3
...