The impact of climate change on the parasites and infectious diseases of aquatic animals.

@article{Marcogliese2008TheIO,
  title={The impact of climate change on the parasites and infectious diseases of aquatic animals.},
  author={David J. Marcogliese},
  journal={Revue scientifique et technique},
  year={2008},
  volume={27 2},
  pages={
          467-84
        }
}
  • D. Marcogliese
  • Published 1 August 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Revue scientifique et technique
Climate change is predicted to have important effects on parasitism and disease in freshwater and marine ecosystems, with consequences for human health and socio-economics. The distribution of parasites and pathogens will be directly affected by global warming, but also indirectly, through effects on host range and abundance. To date, numerous disease outbreaks, especially in marine organisms, have been associated with climatic events such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In general… Expand
The Distribution and Abundance of Parasites in Aquatic Ecosystems in a Changing Climate: More than Just Temperature.
  • D. Marcogliese
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Integrative and comparative biology
  • 2016
TLDR
Results from the recent use of trematodes and specifically their early life cycle stages in testing effects of temperature and other climate-driven variables on life history traits and host-parasite interactions are reviewed and discussed. Expand
Marine Parasites and Disease in the Era of Global Climate Change.
  • J. E. Byers
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Annual review of marine science
  • 2020
TLDR
As examples of climate's influence on parasitism increase, they enable generalizations of expected responses as well as insight into useful study approaches, such as thermal performance curves that compare the vital rates of hosts and parasites when exposed to several temperatures across a gradient. Expand
Climate change and infectious diseases of wildlife: Altered interactions between pathogens, vectors and hosts
TLDR
How climate change may impact infectious diseases of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife is reviewed and more emphasis should be given to the integration of biomedical and ecological research for studying both the physio- logical and ecological mechanisms which mediate climate change impacts on disease. Expand
Climate change: what will it do to fish–parasite interactions?
TLDR
Strong multifactorial effects of climate change on fish-parasite systems are indicated, with increased water temperature predicted to enhance parasite metabolism, resulting in more rapid spread of parasites and the occurrence of some parasites could also decrease if the optimal temperature for growth and transmission is exceeded. Expand
Interaction of disease and temperature on the aerobic scope of freshwater fish and implications for changing climates
TLDR
It is suggested that fish are less tolerant of infection at higher water temperatures and that a combination of higher water temperature and increased exposure to pathogens may decrease aerobic scope and therefore fitness. Expand
Assessing the impact of climate change on disease emergence in freshwater fish in the United Kingdom.
TLDR
Increasing water temperatures and the negative effects of extreme weather events are likely to alter the freshwater environment adversely for both wild and farmed salmonid populations, increasing their susceptibility to disease and the likelihood of disease emergence. Expand
Climate change and foodborne transmission of parasites: A consideration of possible interactions and impacts for selected parasites
TLDR
This review aims to open the readers mind to how exposure routes and transmission routes may be affected by climate change: realization of the possibilities is the first step towards closing the door to the parasites that are knocking at it. Expand
The effect of climate on host-parasite interactions
TLDR
The importance of considering the effect of host biology and coinfecting parasites in combination with climate when investigating the effect that future climatic changes may have on host-parasite interactions is highlighted. Expand
Increasing water temperature and disease risks in aquatic systems: climate change increases the risk of some, but not all, diseases.
TLDR
The effect of increasing water temperature on aquatic disease dynamics is demonstrated, but the importance of the biology of each disease, as well as the role of local conditions, in determining the direction and magnitude of these effects are emphasised. Expand
Climate change enhances disease processes in crustaceans: case studies in lobsters, crabs, and shrimps
  • J. Shields
  • Biology
  • Journal of Crustacean Biology
  • 2019
TLDR
Rising temperature and acidification act as stressors that negatively affect host barriers to infection, thus enhancing disease processes and influencing the emergence of pathogens in ecologically and commercially important species. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 138 REFERENCES
Climate Warming and Disease Risks for Terrestrial and Marine Biota
TLDR
To improve the ability to predict epidemics in wild populations, it will be necessary to separate the independent and interactive effects of multiple climate drivers on disease impact. Expand
Global climate change and emerging infectious diseases.
TLDR
Analyzing the role of climate in the emergence of human infectious diseases will require interdisciplinary cooperation among physicians, climatologists, biologists, and social scientists to help optimize preventive strategies. Expand
ARE DISEASES INCREASING IN THE OCEAN
TLDR
Indirect evidence exists that warming increased disease in turtles, and protection, pollution, and terrestrial pathogens increased mammal disease, and release from overfished predators increased sea urchin disease. Expand
The ecology of climate change and infectious diseases
The projected global increase in the distribution and prevalence of infectious diseases with climate change suggests a pending societal crisis. The subject is increasingly attracting the attention ofExpand
Climate warming may cause a parasite-induced collapse in coastal amphipod populations
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a 3.8°C increase in ambient temperature will likely result in a parasite-induced collapse of the amphipod population, well within the range predicted to prevail by the year 2075 in the International Wadden Sea region from where the model data are obtained. Expand
Climate change, parasitism and the structure of intertidal ecosystems
TLDR
The likely interactions between climate change and parasitism are discussed in the context of intertidal ecosystems, and the extreme sensitivity of cercarial production in parasitic trematodes to increases in temperature is documented, and how global warming could lead to enhanced trematode infections is discussed. Expand
Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians
TLDR
It is shown that the effects of eutrophication cascade through the parasite life cycle to promote algal production, the density of snail hosts, and, ultimately, the intensity of infection in amphibians, promoting amphibian disease through two distinctive pathways. Expand
Global warming and temperature-mediated increases in cercarial emergence in trematode parasites
TLDR
The results suggest that the small increases in air and water temperature forecast by many climate models will not only influence the geographical distribution of some diseases, but may also promote the proliferation of their infective stages in many ecosystems. Expand
Climate disruption and parasite–host dynamics: patterns and processes associated with warming and the frequency of extreme climatic events
TLDR
It is speculated that climate disruption will lead to increased frequency and intensity of disease outbreaks in parasite populations not regulated by acquired immunity. Expand
Effects of environmental change on emerging parasitic diseases.
TLDR
The combined effects of environmentally detrimental changes in local land use and alterations in global climate disrupt the natural ecosystem and can increase the risk of transmission of parasitic diseases to the human population. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...