The impact factor's Matthew Effect: A natural experiment in bibliometrics

@article{Larivire2010TheIF,
  title={The impact factor's Matthew Effect: A natural experiment in bibliometrics},
  author={Vincent Larivi{\`e}re and Yves Gingras},
  journal={J. Assoc. Inf. Sci. Technol.},
  year={2010},
  volume={61},
  pages={424-427}
}
Since the publication of Robert K. Merton's theory of cumulative advantage in science (Matthew Effect), several empirical studies have tried to measure its presence at the level of papers, individual researchers, institutions, or countries. However, these studies seldom control for the intrinsic “quality” of papers or of researchers—“better” (however defined) papers or researchers could receive higher citation rates because they are indeed of better quality. Using an original method for… 

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