The ignoring paradox: cueing distractor features leads first to selection, then to inhibition of to-be-ignored items.

@article{Moher2012TheIP,
  title={The ignoring paradox: cueing distractor features leads first to selection, then to inhibition of to-be-ignored items.},
  author={Jeff Moher and Howard E. Egeth},
  journal={Attention, perception & psychophysics},
  year={2012},
  volume={74 8},
  pages={1590-605}
}
Observers find a target item more quickly when they have foreknowledge of target-defining attributes, such as identity, color, or location. However, it is less clear whether foreknowledge of nontarget attributes can also speed search. Munneke, Van der Stigchel, and Theeuwes Acta Psychologica 129:101-107, (2008) found that observers found the target more quickly when they were cued to ignore a region of space where a target would not appear. Using a similar paradigm, we explored the effects of… CONTINUE READING
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