The hydrostatic gradient, not light availability, drives height-related variation in Sequoia sempervirens (Cupressaceae) leaf anatomy.

@article{Oldham2010TheHG,
  title={The hydrostatic gradient, not light availability, drives height-related variation in Sequoia sempervirens (Cupressaceae) leaf anatomy.},
  author={A. R. Oldham and Stephen C. Sillett and A. Tomescu and G. Koch},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2010},
  volume={97 7},
  pages={
          1087-97
        }
}
UNLABELLED PREMISE OF THE STUDY Leaves at the tops of most trees are smaller, thicker, and in many other ways different from leaves on the lowermost branches. This height-related variation in leaf structure has been explained as acclimation to differing light environments and, alternatively, as a consequence of hydrostatic, gravitational constraints on turgor pressure that reduce leaf expansion. • METHODS To separate hydrostatic effects from those of light availability, we used anatomical… Expand
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