The hydrogen hypothesis for the first eukaryote

@article{Martin1998TheHH,
  title={The hydrogen hypothesis for the first eukaryote},
  author={William F. Martin and Mikl{\'o}s M{\"u}ller},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1998},
  volume={392},
  pages={37-41}
}
A new hypothesis for the origin of eukaryotic cells is proposed, based on the comparative biochemistry of energy metabolism. Eukaryotes are suggested to have arisen through symbiotic association of an anaerobic, strictly hydrogen-dependent, strictly autotrophic archaebacterium (the host) with a eubacterium (the symbiont) that was able to respire, but generated molecular hydrogen as a waste product of anaerobic heterotrophic metabolism. The host's dependence upon molecular hydrogen produced by… Expand

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