The human genus.

@article{Wood1999TheHG,
  title={The human genus.},
  author={B. Wood and M. Collard},
  journal={Science},
  year={1999},
  volume={284 5411},
  pages={
          65-71
        }
}
A general problem in biology is how to incorporate information about evolutionary history and adaptation into taxonomy. The problem is exemplified in attempts to define our own genus, Homo. Here conventional criteria for allocating fossil species to Homo are reviewed and are found to be either inappropriate or inoperable. We present a revised definition, based on verifiable criteria, for Homo and conclude that two species, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, do not belong in the genus. The… Expand
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Erratum to: Defining Genera of New World Monkeys: The Need for a Critical View in a Necessarily Arbitrary Task
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If species cannot unambiguously be identified in the fossil record without extended discussions about taxa, then hypodigms are difficult to establish and, as a result, many nominal species are kept under suspicion. Expand
Early Homo and the role of the genus in paleoanthropology.
  • B. Villmoare
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  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2018
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The history of discovery and debate over early Homo is reviewed, and a taxonomic model is proposed that hews closely to current models for hominin phylogeny and is consistent with taxonomic practice across evolutionary biology. Expand
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  • International Journal of Primatology
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The naming of new species in hominin evolution: A radical proposal--A temporary cessation in assigning new names.
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  • 2009
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The definition of the genus Homo is an important but under‐researched topic. In this chapter, we show that interpretations of Homo have changed greatly over the last 150 years as a result of theExpand
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References

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It is remarkable that the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the earliest known representatives of our own genus, Homo, remain obscure. Advances in techniques for absolute dating andExpand
Homoplasy and earlyHomo: an analysis of the evolutionary relationships ofH. habilissensu stricto andH. rudolfensis
TLDR
A cladistic analysis of 48 of the most commonly-used cranial characters from recent studies of Pliocene hominid phylogeny and which distinguish two taxa within H. habilis sensu latos suggests that these fossils have different evolutionary affinities. Expand
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Empirical appraisal of closely related extant species suggests, however, that intraspecific variants are rarely recognizable on the basis of hard-tissue morphology, and that distinctive hard-Tissue “morphs” will almost certainly correspond to disjunct species or even to closely related groups. Expand
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It is not clear why all the various morphs distinguishable in the Middle-to-Late Pleistocene are generally subsumed within the single species Homo sapiens, and it is thus important to ensure that they are not relegated to the epiphenomenological status of subspecies unless there is compelling reason for doing so. Expand
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There is a sound theoretical reason for regarding the species as a basic taxonomic category, and a means for reframing the definition in cytogenetic terms. Expand
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TLDR
The morphological adaptations of mammalian assemblages found with early hominids are used to reconstruct the habitat based on each species' ecological adaptations, thus minimizing problems introduced by taxonomy and taphonomy. Expand
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TLDR
Using the PAUP (phylogenetic analysis using parsimony) program, nine different hominid groups allocated to the genus Homo have been included in a numerical cladistic analysis, suggesting that characters in common were homoplasies. Expand
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TLDR
The new material found in 1963 makes it possible to draw conclusions and to give a diagnosis for a new species of the genus Homo, as shown in this article. Expand
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