The human chin revisited: what is it and who has it?

@article{Schwartz2000TheHC,
  title={The human chin revisited: what is it and who has it?},
  author={J. Schwartz and I. Tattersall},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2000},
  volume={38 3},
  pages={
          367-409
        }
}
  • J. Schwartz, I. Tattersall
  • Published 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of human evolution
  • Although the presence of a "chin" has long been recognized as unique to Homo sapiens among mammals, both the ontogeny and the morphological details of this structure have been largely overlooked. Here we point out the essential features of symphyseal morphology in H. sapiens, which are present and well-defined in the fetus at least as early as the fifth gestational month. Differences among adults in expression of these structures, particularly in the prominence of the mental tuberosity, are… CONTINUE READING
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