The human Y chromosome: an evolutionary marker comes of age

@article{Jobling2003TheHY,
  title={The human Y chromosome: an evolutionary marker comes of age},
  author={Mark A. Jobling and Chris Tyler-Smith},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2003},
  volume={4},
  pages={598-612}
}
Until recently, the Y chromosome seemed to fulfil the role of juvenile delinquent among human chromosomes — rich in junk, poor in useful attributes, reluctant to socialize with its neighbours and with an inescapable tendency to degenerate. The availability of the near-complete chromosome sequence, plus many new polymorphisms, a highly resolved phylogeny and insights into its mutation processes, now provide new avenues for investigating human evolution. Y-chromosome research is growing up. 
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