The hologenome theory disregards the coral holobiont

@article{Leggat2007TheHT,
  title={The hologenome theory disregards the coral holobiont},
  author={William P. Leggat and Tracy D. Ainsworth and John C. Bythell and Sophie G. Dove and Ruth D Gates and Ove Hoegh‐Guldberg and Roberto Iglesias-Prieto and David Yellowlees},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={5},
  pages={-}
}
The ‘hologenome theory of evolution’, proposed by Rosenberg and colleagues1, suggests that reef corals, and by extrapolation other multicellular organisms, adapt to environmental stress by alterations in their resident microbial communities. Although this is an interesting idea, we strongly disagree with aspects of this theory, specifically those that arise from the omission and flawed interpretation of the coral literature (for reviews of omitted literature see Refs 2,3). 
The hologenome theory disregards the coral holobiont: reply from Rosenberg et al.
The major criticisms of Leggat and colleagues1 are: first, “bleaching is a broad stress response in corals, which has been observed even in the absence of the proposed bacterial causal agents” and
The Mesophotic Coral Microbial Biosphere
TLDR
Advances in understanding of the coral holobiont in the mesophotic zone are reviewed, focusing on both eukaryotic and prokaryotic symbionts, and compare and contrast this to the understanding of shallow-water corals.
Physiological responses of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis to bacterial stress from Vibrio coralliilyticus
TLDR
Investigation of the physiological and transcriptomic responses of a major reef-building coral when exposed to a specific pathogen under virulent (increasing water temperature) and non-virulent (constant low temperature) conditions suggests that coral tissue invasion occurs upon increasing water temperature only.
The future of coral reefs: a microbial perspective.
The hologenome concept: we need to incorporate function
TLDR
This article focuses on the aspect of functional integration, a central holobiont property, which is only rarely considered thoroughly and concludes that the holobions comes in degrees, i.e., the property of being a holobIONt as a continuous trait that is term holobontness, and that holobiantness is differentiated in several dimensions.
Beneficial roles of microorganisms in the coral reef ecosystem
TLDR
This review focuses mainly on distinctive roles of coral associated microorganisms which benefit the well-being and survival of the holobiont — this being the ―complex symbiosis between the coral animal, endobiotic alga and an array of microorganisms‖ — as nutritive and defensive aids in the reef.
Problems of multi-species organisms: endosymbionts to holobionts
TLDR
How often organisms evolve from two or more formerly independent organisms is focused on and two canonical transitions of this type—replicators clustered in cells and endosymbiotic organelles within host cells—demonstrate the reality of this kind of evolutionary transition and suggest conditions that can favor it.
The hologenome concept of evolution : a philosophical and biological study
TLDR
This thesis constitutes a conceptual effort to defend philosophically the hologenome concept, arguing that the criticism according to which holobiont selection requires tight transgenerational host-genotypes-to-symbiont-genotype connection is grounded on a metaphysical view of the worldAccording to which the biological hierarchy needs to be nested, such that each new level of selection includes every entity from below.
Coral Reef Biodiversity in the Face of Climatic Changes
Loss of marine biodiversity seems inevitable in the 21st century. In benthic marine systems, survivors will have to acclimatize to seawater constantly increasing in temperature and evolving
Broadcast Spawning Coral Mussismilia hispida Can Vertically Transfer its Associated Bacterial Core
TLDR
The collective data suggest that spawner corals, such as M. hispida, can transmit Symbiodinium cells and the bacterial core to their offspring by a coral gamete, supporting the HTE, but more data are required to indicate the stability of the transmitted populations to indicate whether the holobiont can be considered a unit of natural selection or a symbiotic assemblage of independently evolving organisms.
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Generalization of the coral probiotic hypothesis has led to the hologenome theory of evolution, which proposes the occurrence of a dynamic relationship between symbiotic microorganisms and corals that selects for the coral holobiont that is best suited for the prevailing environmental conditions.
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Research must now explore key issues such as the extent to which the thermal tolerances of corals and their symbionts are dynamic if bleaching and disease are linked; how the loss of high densities of reef-building coral will affect other dependent species; and, how the Loss of coral populations will affect the millions of people globally who depend on coral reefs for their daily survival.
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