The history of the golgi apparatus in neurones from its discovery in 1898 to electron microscopy

@article{Drscher1998TheHO,
  title={The history of the golgi apparatus in neurones from its discovery in 1898 to electron microscopy},
  author={Ariane Dr{\"o}scher},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={1998},
  volume={47},
  pages={199-203}
}
  • A. Dröscher
  • Published 1 October 1998
  • Biology
  • Brain Research Bulletin

Camillo Golgi (1843–1926)

TLDR
Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells that enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision.

Camillo Golgi (1843–1926)

  • J. Gijn
  • Biology
    Journal of Neurology
  • 2001
TLDR
Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells that enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision.

Camillo Golgi (1843–1926)

TLDR
Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells that enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision.

Camillo Golgi, 1843-1926

TLDR
Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells that enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision.

CAMILLO GOLGI 1843-1926

TLDR
Camillo Golgi studied the central nervous system during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Italy, and he developed a staining technique to visualize brain cells that enabled him to see the cellular structure of brain cells, called neurons, with much greater precision.

From the ”apparato reticolare interno” to ”the Golgi”: 100 years of Golgi apparatus research

TLDR
The discussion of the Golgi apparatus was characterized by a great variety of theories and innovative terminology, with signs of keen interest already evident during the era of light microscopy.

Camillo Golgi (1843–1926)

  • P. Mazzarello
  • Medicine
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
  • 1998
TLDR
The Italian physician and biologist Camillo Golgi was born in Corteno (now Corteno Golgi) a tiny village in northern Lumbardy and began to learn histological techniques under the direction of Giulio Bizzozero at the Hospital of San Matteo.

Cellular dimensions and cell dynamics, or the difficulty over capturing time and space in the era of electron microscopy.

  • A. Dröscher
  • Biology
    Studies in history and philosophy of biological and biomedical sciences
  • 2011

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES

Camillo Golgi and the discovery of the Golgi apparatus.

TLDR
The discovery of the Golgi apparatus can be added to the long list of accidental discoveries, but the man after whom it is named was not a cytologist engaged in studying the inner structure of the cell, but a pathologist searching to prove a neuroanatomical theory.

THE GOLGI APPARATUS IN NEURONS AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE COMMON LIMPET PATELLA VULGATA

  • D. Lacy
  • Biology
    The Journal of biophysical and biochemical cytology
  • 1957
TLDR
In cells containing a Golgi network it is suggested that the membrane extends through the whole of the apparatus in such a way that the substance it encloses may be regarded as being in a continuous phase.

ON THE NATURE OF THE CANALICULAR APPARATUS OF ANIMAL CELLS

TLDR
The progress that has been made along the different lines of investigation is summarized, and the interpretations of these structures which have been advanced by different workers are considered.

A study of the spheroid system of sympathetic neurones with special reference to the problem of neurosecretion.

  • O. L. Thomas
  • Biology
    The Quarterly journal of microscopical science
  • 1948
1. Evidence is put forward in support of the view that the Golgi complement of the vertebrate sympathetic neurone consists of a dispersed system of spherical bodies. These bodies can be studied in

Part II. Cytoplasmic inclusions during the differentiation and growth of the nerve cells

TLDR
It is concluded that the lipochondria and filamentous mitochondria are not necessarily self-reproducing bodies and Gatenby's three-phase theory for nerve cells does not apply to Locusta.

The Cytoplasmic Inclusions of a Mammalian Sympathetic Neurone: A Histochemical Study

TLDR
The neurones studied were those of the anterior mesenteric and coeliac ganglia of immature rabbits, and the results indicate that the lipochondria consist of galactolipid (cerebrosid) and phospholipids, though the smallest ones may perhaps consist of GalactolIPid only.

The Cytology of Glandular Secretion

TLDR
The problem of glandular secretion shapes itself for the cytologist in terms decidedly different from those to which the physiologist is accustomed, and includes all that large group of phenomena in which materials of many kinds are elaborated in the cytoplasm only to be returned to the cell-system, or else extruded as a part of some secretion.

Memoirs: The Cytoplasmic Inclusions of the Germ-Cells. Part V. The Gametogenesis and early Development of Limnæa Stagnalis (L.), with Special Reference to the Golgi Apparatus and the Mitochondria

TLDR
The difference between the Golgi apparatus of a young oocyte and a full-grown ovum lies, not iu the fact that the Gol Gi rods of the latter are individually very much larger than those of the former, but mainly in the fact of the rods have increased enormously in number by binary fission.

Widespread occurrence of anti-troponin T crossreactive components in non-muscle cells.

TLDR
Using a monoclonal antibody generated against striated muscle troponin T, the presence of crossreactive components in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells was noted and the nature of the crossreaction and the extent of its occurrence was established.