• Corpus ID: 229183658

The history of movement disorders

@inproceedings{Lanska2011TheHO,
  title={The history of movement disorders},
  author={Douglas J. Lanska},
  year={2011}
}
The distinction between cortex, white matter, and subcortical nuclei was appreciated by Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) and Francisco Piccolomini (1520–1604) in the 16th century (Vesalius, 1542; Piccolomini, 1630; Goetz et al., 2001a), and a century later British physician Thomas Willis (1621–1675) implicated the corpus striatum in motor function: “When I opened a number of cadavers of patients who had died from a long paralysis . . . I always found the striate bodies more softened than any other… 
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References

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TLDR
A series of explanatory panels, accompanied by photographs, diagrams and original artifacts that traced the early history of movement disorders from several perspectives are developed.
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This investigation has been chiefly directed to finding an answer to the question whether the symptoms of Parkinsonism are chiefly due to lesions in the corpus striatum and globus pallidus or to lesionsIn the pigmented cells of the brain-stem, especially the substantia nigra.
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Parts of the history of one of the signs that James Parkinson mentioned, that is, tremor, are studied to see how the meaning of this term evolved since its description by Galen, particularly in the period from the 16th to the 18th centuries.
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The first description of what is now called double athetosis was given in 1873 by Shaw 10 from several cases in which "grotesque," involuntary movements of the fingers and toes occurred unilaterally.
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There are two types of tremor: postural tremor and tremor of attitude, both present while the limb remains immobile, whether by wilful design or when at rest in a position of posture and subject only to the action of gravity.
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