The heart of darkness

@article{Christensen2007TheHO,
  title={The heart of darkness},
  author={John F. Christensen and Wendy S Levinson and Patrick M. Dunn},
  journal={Journal of General Internal Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={7},
  pages={424-431}
}
  • John F. Christensen, W. Levinson, P. Dunn
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Journal of General Internal Medicine
Objectives:To describe how physicians think and feel about their perceived mistakes, to examine how physicians’ prior beliefs and manners of coping with mistakes may influence their emotional responses, and to promote further discussion in the medical community about this sensitive issue.Design:Audiotaped, in-depth interviews with physicians in which each physician discussed a previous mistake and its impact on his or her lift. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed qualitatively and the… Expand
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