The harmonic archipelago as a universal locally free group

@article{Hojka2015TheHA,
  title={The harmonic archipelago as a universal locally free group},
  author={Wolfram Hojka},
  journal={Journal of Algebra},
  year={2015},
  volume={437},
  pages={44-51}
}
  • Wolfram Hojka
  • Published 1 September 2015
  • Mathematics
  • Journal of Algebra

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